jobs

Showing 7 posts tagged jobs

Starting New Job

Proud as a peacock to announce my new full-time job as NBCNEWS.com Senior Staff Writer and Editor tomorrow. I’ll be heading up the Travel section from a consumer perspective and contributing reporting to special NBCNEWS.com editorial projects as needed. Very excited and motivated by this collaborative newsroom full of awesome journalists. Glad I have a chance to be a part of it!

Trading camos for blue smocks

They’re not actually smocks anymore, Walmart switched to dark-blue polos years ago, but Walmart is giving them out to any qualifying military veteran who wants one.

In the Walmart’s projected hiring of 100,000 veterans story I wrote yesterday, the most interesting thing to me, and quite possibly the only part of the news that is actually any different from status quo, is that vets will get “Priority Access” over civilians. A company spokesperson told me this means that if an open job comes down to two equally qualified candidates, one a veteran and the other not, the vet gets the job.

Also note the company’s use of the word “projected,” not planned, or promised. In their fact sheet (PDF) the company says that no new positions will be created. So it’s quite possible the company, which said it hired over 100,000 vets over the past five years, is just gonna keep doing what it was already doing. That the tax credits for hiring vets, between $2,400-$9,600 per hire, were extended as part of the fiscal cliff package just sweetens the deal.

Wal-Mart plans to hire 100,000 veterans [TODAY]

Attending a mandatory resume assessment at the request of the New York State department of labor. You need to do these to keep receiving unemployment. All the staff are real friendly. Us citizens are called “customers” and the processing desks are called “customer service.”
Right now 24 of us are sitting at the 24 school desks in the beige, fluorescent lit room. A man in a camo jacket strikes up a deal with another guy in line and pays him $25 to call him on his cellphone if his name gets called because he has to duck out and take care of something. Three men walk out grumbling that the next appointment they’ve been given conflicts with a doctor’s appointment.
"Lyle Simmons?"
A 50 year old man in a black trenchcoat rises from his desk, makes his way past the leather ropes and enters the door at the end of the room to receive his resume assessment. A baby gurgles in the corner. A woman with shortcropped blonde hair calls out a Russian-pronounced name and the balding man next to me gets up. A young woman with gold hoop earrings and heels takes his place. Another name is called, and it’s someone I saw when I first got in the room 40 minutes ago. I think I’m going to be here a while.  It will give me time to think.
I’m here, on the taxpayer dole, taking up air and time, and plastic desk with a built-in pencil groove. I could be setting up meets and polishing my self-promotional collateral, applying for jobs. But I don’t need to. We have savings, I’m pitching articles, getting re-centered and taking trips. I have the luxury to do so and I want savor the freedom I have, and reassemble after going through the psychological ringer. Plus I’ve worked since I was 16. I paid my taxes, I deserve a little piece back for a brief period.  As I rationalize, behind me a man lightly snores.
"Are you here for the basic computer class?" a customer service asks another customer.
I wonder what the customer service rep will think of my resume and goals. Will he ask me what am I doing here? Curious to find out. Then it’s off to lunch on the lower east side with a New York Daily News reporter, then to the Verizon store to get our iPhone4S order changed, and to the UPS office in the financial district that takes deposits for USAA because I have a check to deposit that’s too large to do deposit at home over the mobile, and arrange an interview with the socialiate who rented out her apartment for a “dinner party” that turned out to be a leather s&m romp. Just another day in the hustle. High-res

Attending a mandatory resume assessment at the request of the New York State department of labor. You need to do these to keep receiving unemployment. All the staff are real friendly. Us citizens are called “customers” and the processing desks are called “customer service.”

Right now 24 of us are sitting at the 24 school desks in the beige, fluorescent lit room. A man in a camo jacket strikes up a deal with another guy in line and pays him $25 to call him on his cellphone if his name gets called because he has to duck out and take care of something. Three men walk out grumbling that the next appointment they’ve been given conflicts with a doctor’s appointment.

"Lyle Simmons?"

A 50 year old man in a black trenchcoat rises from his desk, makes his way past the leather ropes and enters the door at the end of the room to receive his resume assessment. A baby gurgles in the corner. A woman with shortcropped blonde hair calls out a Russian-pronounced name and the balding man next to me gets up. A young woman with gold hoop earrings and heels takes his place. Another name is called, and it’s someone I saw when I first got in the room 40 minutes ago. I think I’m going to be here a while. It will give me time to think.

I’m here, on the taxpayer dole, taking up air and time, and plastic desk with a built-in pencil groove. I could be setting up meets and polishing my self-promotional collateral, applying for jobs. But I don’t need to. We have savings, I’m pitching articles, getting re-centered and taking trips. I have the luxury to do so and I want savor the freedom I have, and reassemble after going through the psychological ringer. Plus I’ve worked since I was 16. I paid my taxes, I deserve a little piece back for a brief period. As I rationalize, behind me a man lightly snores.

"Are you here for the basic computer class?" a customer service asks another customer.

I wonder what the customer service rep will think of my resume and goals. Will he ask me what am I doing here? Curious to find out. Then it’s off to lunch on the lower east side with a New York Daily News reporter, then to the Verizon store to get our iPhone4S order changed, and to the UPS office in the financial district that takes deposits for USAA because I have a check to deposit that’s too large to do deposit at home over the mobile, and arrange an interview with the socialiate who rented out her apartment for a “dinner party” that turned out to be a leather s&m romp. Just another day in the hustle.